Introducing the project's results in the Hanoi Forum 2018
Dr. Pham Thi Thanh Nga, the project's principal investigator, presented the results of the project "Utilizing geospatial technology to assess health vulnerability to climate change for rural population in Vietnam and Philippines" in the Hanoi Forum is an international academic conference co-hosted by Vietnam National University, Hanoi (VNU) and Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies (KFAS).

Hanoi Forum 2018 is an international academic conference co-hosted by Vietnam National University, Hanoi (VNU) and Korea Foundation for Advanced Studies (KFAS). The general theme of Hanoi Forum is “Towards Sustainable Development”. Hanoi Forum aims at promoting the goal of inclusive and sustainable development for all. It encourages interdisciplinary research that push our knowledge limits in understanding socio-economic growth and conservation, interactions between human and environment, prosperity and equality.

https://hanoiforum.vnu.edu.vn/hanoi-forum-2018

At the conference, Dr. Pham Thi Thanh Nga, the project's principal investigator, presented our results in Panel 3 "Climate change response". The summary of Dr. Nga presentation is " Vietnam and Philippines are recognized as the most vulnerable to climate change due to regular flooding and frequent typhoons and therefore an increased burden of climate change related diseases. Changes in temperature and precipitation are likely to alter the incidence and distribution of vector-borne diseases such as dengue. This study focuses on mapping vulnerability to dengue over Vietnam and Philippines by applying the Water-Associated Disease Index approach developed by Dickin et al. (2013) and using geospatial data. These data include annual land cover and monthly temperature extracted from MODIS and monthly precipitation from GSMaP (Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation). The maps, produced for the period of years 2004-2015, helped in analysing temporal and spatial patterns of vulnerability to dengue in both countries. There is clear seasonal variation in the vulnerability following variability in the climate factor. Pearson’s correlation was used to evaluate the associations between dengue rates and vulnerability aggregated at the provincial level. Significant linear associations, with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.5, were found in the Mekong River Delta region of Vietnam. Mapping vulnerability to dengue using geospatial technology seems to be effective means for supporting public health authorities in disease control and intervention for two countries of the ASEAN region". 

Dr. Nga is introducing the project's results

Relation